“I don’t have money,” Mason said, “to pay for other people’s health insurance.”

That may be the most insightful statement of the misguided conservative philosophy of self-interest I have ever heard. Senator, you already pay for other people’s health insurance. And assuming you have health insurance, other people pay for yours. That’s the way insurance works.

Very few people can afford to pay out of pocket for health care, so we pool our resources. No one pays in as much as they collect if and when they become seriously ill. We all underwrite one another. That’s why we need young, healthy people in the pool and why there is a health care mandate. And if people do not have health insurance, we pay for their care in the increased cost of our own health care and hospitalization.

The same is true of life insurance. Sure, you pay premiums, but when you cash out, it’s other people’s money that pays the death benefit. No one pays their own way in this world.

I first became aware of the emboldened and benighted selfishness of the conservative right when I served on the local School Committee back in the 1990s and heard people arguing that they should not have to pay for other people’s kids to go to school. Somehow the idea that you shouldn’t have to pay for anything that doesn’t directly benefit you swept through the conservative movement like a self-inflicted virus.

A decade on, I find it extremely tiresome to hear conservatives constantly complain about paying for health care, unemployment benefits and food stamps as though they were footing the entire bill themselves. They would have you believe that they not only pay their own way, but also have to support an entire family of illegal immigrants on welfare.

To begin with, no one pays their own way. We are all supported by other people’s money. And when it comes to taxes, the portion that goes to assist the poor is a pittance.

The American way of life is underwritten by the tax dollars we pool to support a civil society and the money we pay into a social safety network of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and military and public pensions. No one other than criminals would be able to make a living, were it not for our concerted effort to work for the common good.

Of course, conservatives don’t believe in the common good, which to me means they don’t believe in America. Only in the perverse logic of the right, for example, could a Nevada rancher who refuses to pay the same fees as other ranchers for grazing his cattle on public land be considered some kind of a folk hero. He’s a thief.

The Universal Notebook: Other people’s money | The Forecaster (via other-stuff)

(via askawelfarecaseworker)

Asking a person to acknowledge how pervasive an oppressive system is directly challenges their place within it, and that makes people uncomfortable. It makes people angry. And it’s easier to dismiss someone than admit you don’t have all the answers.

This is particularly true when the subject is male violence against women, whether that abuse is sexual, psychological, physical or some combination of all of the above.

In no other realm would anyone try to argue that a person’s experience with a subject actually disqualifies them from offering an opinion about it.

Imagine telling a veteran that they’re too emotionally connected to the subject of war to discuss it properly. Anyone making that argument in public would be dismissed as a crank—and they should be, because it’s an absurd argument. We otherwise readily acknowledge that a person’s direct experience with a subject makes them more qualified to discuss it. It doesn’t grant them infallibility, of course. Nobody can lay claim to that. We’re talking about some level of expertise that the average person doesn’t necessarily possess.

But we hold women to a different standard when the subject is abuse. And then we dismiss them as conspiracy theorists when they start to talk about the existence of a rape culture.
Survivors Aren’t Censoring You. But You Might Be Censoring Them. | anthonybsusan (via brutereason)

(via feministdarling)

stagbeetleloveit:

I’m fucking crying

stagbeetleloveit:

I’m fucking crying

(via inali)

People seem to think embracing life means to jump off cliffs and kiss strangers. Maybe it’s just slowly learning to love yourself. — (via lipstick-bullet)

(via feministdarling)

"Women are the niggers of gender," the email said. "If you killed yourself, I wouldn’t even fuck the corpse."

I blinked at my phone, fighting simultaneous urges to hurl my phone across the room in anger and cry. Later that day, someone texted me my address — telling me they’d “See me when I least expected it.”

I haven’t been out to my car at night by myself since January 2nd.

My name is Brianna Wu. I lead a development studio that makes games. Sometimes, I write about issues in the games industry that relate to the equality of women. My reward is that I regularly have men threatening to rape and commit acts of violence against me.

No skin thick enough: The daily harassment of women in the game industry | Polygon (via brutereason)

That is terrible and heart breaking on so many levels

(via starcunning)

(via misandry-mermaid)

If you think women are crazy you’ve never had a dude go from hitting on you to literally threatening to kill you in the time it takes you to say “no thanks.” — Kendra Wells. (via mysharona1987)

(via stfumras)

actionables:

osamabenladenofficial:

actionables:

hmm, yoga is kind of girly #nohomo let’s rename it so it sounds manlier and make it just for the bros for the bros only

It’s crazy how some feminists get mad when men take something stereotypically feminine and turn it into a new branch to incite more men to do it. Like good for them, they’re helping men stay healthy, what’s the problem with that?

listen here sweetie

Yoga was never, and will never be stereotypically feminine.

actionables:

osamabenladenofficial:

actionables:

hmm, yoga is kind of girly #nohomo
let’s rename it so it sounds manlier and make it just for the bros
for the bros only

It’s crazy how some feminists get mad when men take something stereotypically feminine and turn it into a new branch to incite more men to do it. Like good for them, they’re helping men stay healthy, what’s the problem with that?

listen here sweetie

image

Yoga was never, and will never be stereotypically feminine.

(via stfumras)

Has A Comic Ever Made You Cry?

finaldisciple:

orionmunroe:

blacksupervillain:

werewolfau:

gailsimone:

And please, I don’t mean because it sucked. :)

I mean have you ever teared up because of a story or scene, or character, anything like that, from a comic book?

Batwoman: Elegy when Kate says she’s finally found her way to serve. Every time I’ve ever read that page I cry

last issue of Green Lantern: Rebirth

the death of damian wayne

Nightcrawler’s death in Second Coming. Also that scene in UXF where Betsy puts this memory of her and Warren growing old and dying together into Warren’s head while he dies in her arms

If I wasn’t so angry when Vaughn killed 355 off in Y: The Last Man, I probably would have.  I damn near ripped it up.

"Too cool to be forgotten." Really good comic.